How To Capitalize Words

Velká písmena v angličtině plní trochu jinou roli, než v češtině, a kapitalizace slov (capitalizing the words – psaní velkého prvního písmena) se používá mnohem častěji. Zatímco v češtině se velkými písmeny šetří, a jsou pouze na začátku vět a u prvního slova proprietálních pojmenování, v angličtině se dávají velká písmena i do nadpisů, a do všech slov názvů.

  • Czech Republic = Česká republika
  • Department of Defense = Ministerstvo obrany

This is a useful list of things that are capitalized in the English language:

  1. Names of the days of the week, names of the months of the year
    • Monday, Tuesday…
    • January, February… (but spring, fall, summer, winter)
  2. Languages
    • Czech, English, Spanish…
  3. Holidays
    • Christmas, Easter
  4. Nationalities and ethnic groups
    • American, Czech, Indian
  5. Proper names
    • Charles Bridge, Statue of Liberty, President Obama (“Mr. President” is almost always capitalized)
  6. Words derived from proper names (connection with a place)
    • Czech beer, Russian gymnast
  7. Names of distinctive historical periods
    • the Middle Ages, Industrial Revolution
  8. Religious terms
    • Jesus Christ, God, Christians, Muslims, The Old Testament, Prophet, the Last Supper
  9. Titles of movies, books or albums…
    • The Lord of the Ring, The Old Man and the Sea, Stranger Than Fiction
  10. First word in every sentence, first word after direct quotation
    • And he asked: “What are you reading?”
  11. Brand names, names of products
    • Apple, Škoda, Ford, Google (but iPad, iPhone)
  12. The pronoun I (as in I am) is always capitalized
    • My friends and I went to the city.

(source: SpaceTeacher)

Here is a list of words that are usually not capitalized:

“a,” “an,” “and,” “at,” “but,” “by,” “for,” “in,” “nor,” “of,” “on,” “or,” “so,” “the,” “to,” “up,” and “yet

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Filed under Advanced English (pokročilí), Intermediate (středně pokročilí), Základy angličtiny

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